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Periscope page

Welcome to my Periscope page and thanks for visiting. To follow me on Periscope just download the app to your smartphone and search for me @PaulCheall, same as you would for Twitter. When I do a broadcast - a Scope - you'll get a notification.

 

With each Scope I'm telling various stories from Dad's published memoirs. There are some great stories!

 

See opposite for my visit to France in 2016

 

  - Beach at Bray dunes - near Dunkirk, where Dad was evacuated on the Lady of Mann under enemy fire.

 

  - Gold beach at Normandy where Dad landed with the first wave of troops under heavy enemy fire. I show you the bullet-ridden tram stop which comrade Stan Hollis VC shot at from the landing craft

 

  - Later over to the impressive military cemetery at Bayeux, with a few more tragic tales of bravery about comrades buried there.

 

 

Bye, bye, now

 

Paul Cheall

Son of Bill Cheall

 

 

A few notes on Periscope

 

What is Periscope?

Periscope lets you explore the world through the eyes of somebody else. It's the latest way of broadcasting live video via the internet. Click here for more info.

 

How long will a broadcast ("Scope") be?

Each Scope will only be a few minutes long so as not to gobble up your bandwidth or personal time! But broadcasts you miss will also be available to view after the event.

 

How do I get Periscope?

Download the Periscope app on your smart phone and you're nearly there. Search for me, PaulCheall, in the user list and click on the 'add' icon to follow me, similar to Twitter. When I do my Scopes you will get a notification on your phone.

 

ALL THE VIDS ACROSS WOULD HAVE BEEN AVAILABLE LIVE ON PERISCOPE --->>>

 

BONUS VID BELOW, not available on Periscope:

The tragic illustration of how many soldiers were killed in the rearguard action at Dunkirk, 1940 - the story behind the graves at Hinges, just one of the many military cemeteries in France.

Paul Cheall, WW2 podcast and periscope producer

A fact omitted in this video is that the 35,000 men who finally surrendered after covering the final evacuations were mostly French soldiers of 2nd Light Mechanized Division and the 68th Infantry Division. Their resistance allowed the evacuation effort to be extended to 4 June, on which date another 26,175 Frenchmen were brought to England.